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Are you a first time Preggers Mama?  If so, we have some advice for you!  Enjoy it!  Seriously, enjoy this Mother’s Day, because it is the only one that will be like this.  Sleep in.  Maybe you awake to breakfast in bed prepared by a doting husband.  Or, maybe you dress in a cute maternity dress and go to brunch with your family.  An afternoon pedicure.  Quiet time reading a book in the sunshine.

These all sound glorious!  Don’t get me wrong, any Mother’s Day is wonderful because it celebrates our most important job – being a Mom!  But, let’s face it, you’ll never have another Mother’s Day like this one.

For example:

Early Morning Snoozing

1st Time Preggers Mama

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Image from netdoctor.com

Wake up gradually with the warm sun streaming through the window.  Hear the birds chirping and maybe the smell of breakfast cooking.

Veteran Preggers Mama

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Wake up to your pregnant belly hanging off the bed because your other children are occupying the space.  Someone is probably screaming.  Someone might have wet the bed.

Breakfast

1st Time Preggers Mama

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Your darling hubby has been up for an hour making you breakfast in bed.  You leisurely have breakfast together and talk about how wonderful it will be once the baby is here.

Veteran Preggers Mama

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You turned your back for just a moment and breakfast became a scene from a disaster movie.

 Afternoon Activity

1st Time Preggers Mama

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You spend the afternoon getting pampered at a salon.  Or maybe your husband even helps you with your pedicure.

Veteran Preggers Mama

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Here you are on the sidelines watching soccer game number three for the day.  Only two more to go.

Evening Wind Down Time

1st Time Preggers Mama

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You finish off the day with a relaxing bubble bath.  Candles burning.  Calming music in the background.  The scent of lavender floating in the air.

Veteran Preggers Mama

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This time you’re preparing the bath and trying to bathe kids without getting your own clothes wet.  Don’t get soap in your child’s eyes.  And actually it’s a bubble bath because the other child dumped a whole bottle of shampoo in the water.

In all fairness, the 1st Time Preggers Mama scenario is probably a little too perfect.  And even though the Veteran Preggers Mama spent the whole day busy with her kids, she probably wouldn’t change a second of it.  It’s why we’re mamas, right?!

Happy Mother’s Day from all of us at Preggers!

 

It’s National Infertility Awareness Week.  We hope that none of our Preggers mamas have had to tackle this challenge, but since infertility affects more than 5 million people of childbearing age, statistically speaking I’m sure that some of you have.  If you are reading this, and you are one of the 5 million, then most likely you’ve overcome this hurdle.  This week, we recognize your struggles to build your family with some facts that perhaps many people don’t know or understand about infertility.

IVF (in vitro fertilisation) or insemination of female egg with microscope. Digital illustration.

  • 1 in 6 couples struggles with infertility.
  • The clinical definition of infertility is a couple who has been having unprotected sex for one year and hasn’t conceived. This changes to six months if you are a woman over 35 years old.
  • Infertility is NOT an inconvenience; it is a disease of the reproductive system that impairs the body’s ability to perform the basic function of reproduction.
  • In about 40 percent of infertility cases, a medical issue with the woman is the cause. In 30 percent of cases it is the man. And in 20 per cent of cases, both the man and woman are the cause. Approximately 10 percent of infertility cases can’t be explained.
  • There are many different causes of infertility: lack of regular ovulation, a low sperm count, low sperm motility, premature ovarian insufficiency (early menopause) and anatomical problems, such as blocked Fallopian tubes and problems with the uterine cavity. In some couples, there is no obvious cause, which is called unexplained infertility.
  • A woman’s age often plays a role in infertility. According to Health Canada, a 30-year-old woman has a 90 percent chance of getting pregnant. That chance drops to 77 percent by age 35 and 55 percent if you are 40 or older.
  • Twelve percent of all infertility cases are a result of the woman either weighing too little or too much.
  • Men and women who smoke have decreased fertility.
  • Up to 13 percent of female infertility is caused by cigarette smoking.
  • Irregular or abnormal ovulation accounts for approximately 25 percent of all female infertility problems.
  • Investigation into potential causes of infertility can usually be completed over one menstrual cycle.
  • Most infertility cases — 85% to 90% — are treated with conventional medical therapies such as medication or surgery.
  • While vital for some patients, in vitro fertilization and similar treatments account for less than 3% of infertility services, and about (or approximately) seven hundredths of one percent (0.07%) of U.S. health care costs.
  • IUI has a 10 to 20 percent pregnancy rate per procedure—a healthy woman under 35 can expect a success rate of about 19 percent per procedure. Each insemination costs $300 to $500, plus the cost of medications.
  • IVF costs $6,000 and up per cycle, depending on add-ons chosen and whether eggs or embryos are frozen after the cycle.                       blastocyst372

Everyone’s journey toward motherhood is different.  If your experience included more than just you and your partner – more like a room full of doctors and scientists –  know that you’re not alone.

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February 20 is National Love Your Pet Day!  And who among us doesn’t love your pet?  We chose today to dive into the question of whether your pets, namely dogs and cats, actually know that you’re pregnant . . . maybe even before you do.

Okay, let’s back up a little bit.  I don’t think that our pets actually know that you are pregnant or perhaps what that really even means, but they do know that something is different about you.

Most pet owners keep pets because they love the companionship that cats and dogs, or other animals, can give.  These animals become a treasured part of the family. We love them and they in turn love us back.  It starts out as dependence – they need us for food, water, shelter, etc. – but most of them come to love their humans deeply, as well.  Many of them are protective.

Cats and dogs are also very intuitive.  They can sense subtle changes that sometimes we don’t even know.  For instance, my cat seems to always know when I’m about to catch a cold or a virus.  She cuddles up right by me and won’t leave my side.  Sure enough, by the next day, I’m sneezing away, or worse yet, vomiting.  She knew.  They say that some animals can sense when their owner has cancer, specifically skin cancer.  It only makes sense that they would also sense when your body has changed due to pregnancy.

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According to most animal behavior specialists, this ability actually comes from the animal’s excellent sense of smell.  The hormone levels of women change almost immediately once a woman becomes pregnant.  They begin producing elevated levels of estrogen, progesterone and chorionic gonadotropin.  Our senses, not as sensitive as dogs and cats, cannot sense or smell these hormone changes, but many people believe that our pets can.  Perhaps even before a pregnancy test would detect them.

Although it seems likely that dogs and cats really can sense a new pregnancy, they don’t all react in the same ways.  A dog may become protective and not let anyone near you.  Or, quite the opposite, a dog that has always been mild and good natured, may growl at you when you arrive home.  A highly independent cat, may become clingy.  They probably are confused and don’t understand why they feel differently about you, but they know there is something different.

The most important thing to do, regardless of how your pet reacts, is to just keep loving them and keep as much of your regular activities with them as you can.  You’ll reassure your pets that they’re still part of the family and that they’re not going to be abandoned or go hungry.  But, if you’re like me, I won’t really need to tell you that.  You’ll have no problem loving on your pets no matter what!  And most likely, you’ll have a fierce protector for the new little life that will soon be joining your family.

Happy National Love Your Pet Day!

My fur babies keep a watchful eye on my human babies!  Love them all!

Is anyone else excited for the Olympics?  The 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea will begin on February 9.  I pretty much become an Olympic-aholic during this time – summer and winter alike, so I am looking forward to a few weeks of Olympic watching.

Did you know that there have been several athletes that have competed in the Olympics while pregnant?  This is amazing to me, because I certainly wasn’t in Olympic shape during either of my pregnancies.  Okay, I’ll be honest, I’ve never even been close to Olympic shape, but especially not then.  But, that’s just me.  I know that lots of super mamas are still able to be super athletes while carrying a little extra special cargo.  Here are a few of these super Olympic mamas.

Magda Julin – The First Pregnant Olympian
Magda Julin was a Swedish figure skater who competed in the 1920 Olympics and won the gold medal.  At the time of the 1920 Olympics, Julin had only participated in one world championship – 7 years earlier in 1913!  Just before Julin began her Free Skate, she had to change her music.  The world at that time was still reeling from World War I and there was widespread anti-German feelings.  Since Julin was planning on skating to Blue Danube by German composer Johann Strauss, she had to make a last minute change.  She won the gold anyway – all the while being four months pregnant.

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Juno Stover-Irwin – The Pregnant Diving Olympian
Juno Stover-Irwin was an American diver active in the 1950s winning medals at both the 1952 and 1956 games.  Her first medal, a bronze, in 1952 was won while she was 3 ½ months pregnant.

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Anita Spring and Kerri Walsh Jennings – The Pregnant Olympian Beach Volleyball Players
Everyone remembers American Kerri Walsh Jennings and her 2012 Olympic Partner Misty May winning gold on the beach in London.  Jennings would later learn that she competed while in the very early stages of pregnancy.  Jennings also won gold in 2004 in Athens, and 2008 in Beijing, as well as a bronze in 2016 in Rio, albeit not while pregnant.  Before Jennings, there was Anita Spring, an Australian beach volleyball player.  She competed in the 1996 games in Atlanta while four months pregnant.

Amelie Kober – The Pregnant Snowboarder Olympian
Amelie Kober, a German snowboarder competed in the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver while 2 months pregnant.  Although Kober didn’t medal in 2010, she did bring home a silver in 2006 and a bronze in 2014.

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Diana Sartor and Kerstin Szymkowiak – The Pregnant Skeleton Olympians
German skeleton athletes Diana Sartor and Kerstin Szymkowiak both competed while two months pregnant – Sartor in 2006 and Szymkowiak in 2010.  Szymkowiak won a silver medal.

Cornelia Pfohl – The Twice Pregnant Olympian
German archer, Cornelia Pfohl has competed in four separate Olympic games (1992 in Barcelona, 1996 in Atlanta, 2000 in Sydney and 2004 in Athens).  She competed while pregnant in the latter two.  In 2000, she won a bronze medal while in the early stages of pregnancy with daughter Mara.  Her daughter Roselinda was born only 57 days after Pfohl last competed in an Olympic games in 2004.

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Martina Valcepina – The Pregnant with Twins Olympian
Martina Valcepina, an Italian short track speed skater competed at the 2014 Sochi Olympics, while pregnant with twins!!  And she won the bronze medal, too!

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Athletes of all kinds are amazing people, and Olympians especially.  But, hands down, I’m going to say that these ladies take the cake.  And honestly, they put me to shame.  What an amazing story they can share with the special children they were carrying, while competing in the greatest sporting competition the world knows.

 

 

Winter can really be treacherous in some parts of the country – even when you’re not pregnant, but especially so for those pregnant mamas.  There are three main areas that the pregnant mama will have to navigate – weather hazards, germ hazards, and well, wardrobe hazards.

Weather Hazards
Ice, snow – you know where this is going.  How many times do we hear about people falling on the ice and getting injured?  Pretty much every time there’s ice, right?  Your center of gravity changes when you’re pregnant, so you’ll need to take extra care in making sure you don’t fall.  The following are a few tips to help keep you on your feet.

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Image courtesy of pampers.com
  1. Footwear – You’ll need to make sure you have a good, stable pair of rubber-soled shoes or boots. This is particularly useful, even when there isn’t ice and snow as good traction will help you step with confidence.  If you have to trek through ice and snow pretty regularly, we may want to invest in some ice traction slip-ons that you can put over your shoes to help prevent slipping.  Above all, ditch the high heels.

If you do slip, try not to worry too much.  Typically baby is well protected in your womb.  Baby is probably just fine, but you can call your doctor if you need a little peace of mind.  But, if you sense decreased movement or other changes like bleeding or water breaking, definitely call your physician.

  1. Avoid the Ice and Snow to Begin With – When the weather is really bad, you should try to avoid going out altogether. It’s just best not to tempt fate and risk unnecessary injury.  Many local grocery stores have home delivery fees.  This is an excellent time to take advantage of this service.  You can also shop for your baby gear online.  In fact, this is a really good idea, because you can read reviews before you buy.
  2. Ensure You Have a Good Hospital Route – If you’re near the end of your pregnancy, or even if you’re not, you’ll want to make sure you have a good route planned out for getting to the hospital. When you make your plan, have a couple of backup plans in your back pocket, too, as you never know if a certain road is too icy or hazardous to navigate.
  3. Roadside Service Plan – If you really are not able to avoid driving this winter, you may want to have a roadside service plan that you can call in the event of a break down or other emergency.
  4. Don’t Shovel Snow! – Shoveling snow is really back breaking work and this is certainly not the time. You don’t want to risk getting hurt or going into premature labor.

Germ Hazards
Ugh!  Germs and illnesses are rampant this time a year.  Most illnesses are just giant nucenses, but they become a bigger problem during pregnancy when many cold relief drugs are off limits.  But, there are lots of ways to navigate this hazard, too.

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Image courtesy of parenting.com
  1. Prevent – Almost all OB/GYNs recommend that pregnant women get a flu shot once in the second or third trimester. Remember that pregnant women have a somewhat suppressed immune system, making you more susceptible to getting sick.  Although it’s not a sure thing, a simple flu shot will go a long way to preventing the flu.
  2. Wash Your Hands Regularly – You should do this anyway, right? Yes!  But, pay careful attention to this right now.  It will help you stay healthy.  Wash up after each bathroom break, before eating, after grocery shopping or anytime you come into contact with sick people.  You can also carry a small bottle of hand sanitizer in your purse.
  3. Take Something – Yes! If you do get sick, don’t be afraid to take something to help relieve some of the symptoms.  Just make sure you follow your OB/GYN’s instructions.  My doctor always gave me a booklet in the beginning that listed all the safe drugs for every scenario.  There’s really no need to suffer when a little simple relief for you won’t hurt baby at all.
  4. Hydrate – Yep. That one again.  Water just makes everything better.  Drinking plenty of water while pregnant will help to keep your skin from getting too itchy, which tends to happen when it expands.  Winter makes that even worse.
  5. Moisturize – Water won’t do it alone, though. Have a good moisturizer on hand and lather up – often.  Cocoa butter works great for stretching skin, too.

Wardrobe Hazards
Okay this one isn’t as much of a “hazard”, but it can be a point of stress for expecting moms.  For me, it was hard to justify spending good money on an oh-so-temporary wardrobe.  With my first pregnancy, I didn’t worry quite so much because I was sure that I would be using all of these pieces again.  Little did I know that there would be nine years in between my first and second and trends tend to change a little bit in that span of time – and I felt like it was a lot!  But, when I was pregnant with my second, I knew she would be my last, so I tried to make do with what I had from the first go-around.

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Photo courtesy of fitpregnancy.com
  1. Winter Coat – To buy a maternity winter coat or not to buy a maternity winter coat? They’re so expensive and used for such a short time – especially in warmer climes, so really should you buy one?  I think that all depends on your situation.  My first baby was born in December, so of course I was at my biggest when it was really starting to be coat weather.  I didn’t buy a coat for this pregnancy.  I really ended up only needing a coat for about 2 short weeks.  In the late part of the fall, I just layered up.  After that, I wore a looser fitting coat.  It just wasn’t worth it for that short time.  I was only in my first and early second trimester during the winter months of my second pregnancy, so I got away with not buying one again.  Phew!  Some people will just have to suck it up and buy one, though.  If you spend the better part of the winter waddling through your third trimester, it might be worth it to have a good maternity coat.  Or maybe just use an extra coat of your husband’s! 😉
  2. Layer Up – For the rest of your wardrobe, invest in a few pieces that are very versatile. A pair of leggings, a good pair of maternity jeans and some long shirts or tunics will get you through almost anything that you’ll need.
  3. Compression – A pair of compression tights or leggings will round out any good wardrobe. You can dress them up or down, but they also give you the awesome gradient compression qualities.  Gradient compression will help to energize your legs and promote good circulation.
  4. Support Band – A good Preggers Maternity Support Band is another great addition to any maternity wardrobe. The band helps to support your belly and ease back discomfort.

Remembering these few tips will help tremendously in navigating through these winter hazards.  Being pregnant during the winter months may sound dangerous and scary, but I think I’d honestly take that over suffering through the heat of summer at 9 months pregnant!

No need for compression, right?  If you have a good pair of support hose, that’s all you need?  Because compression and support hose are the same thing?

Wrong!

There are actually some very big differences between support hose and compression hose.   In fact, there is even a difference between compression and gradient compression.  Let’s break each one down.

Support Hose

In the world of hosiery, support and control mean the same thing.  An example of this would be like control top pantyhose.  Basically, you have a garment that smooths out abdominal bulges and bumps for a more flattering look.  But the difference is only cosmetic.  The garments don’t actually provide any of the health benefits of compression, nor do they provide support to the legs or feet.

What about items beyond hosiery – like support garments and shapewear.  There are some significant differences here, too.

Compression

Support garments, shapewear and athletic compression are all examples of what is known as all-over compression, or compression that has the same amount of “squeeze” throughout the whole garment.

Support Garments

Here’s where things get a little confusing.  Although support hose generally refer to hosiery like control top pantyhose, support garments are a little different still.  Support garments, or garments that typically cover the abdomen or torso area of the body, actually offer much-needed support for the wearer, as well as gentle shaping.  Preggers Maternity and Postpartum Support Garments are great examples of these.

 

 

Shapewear

You’ve surely seen these items from time to time.  Shapewear, like control-top pantyhose, are meant to slim and shape the waist and body by squeezing bulges and bumps.  They’re like the modern version of a corset or perhaps a bodysuit.

Athletic Compression

Athletic compression is another good example of all-over compression.  A popular trend among professional and amateur athletes alike, athletic compression helps to give athletes extra stability and support.  The types of garments can really be anything, including socks, pants, shirts or sleeves.

Gradient Compression

A gradient compression garment takes the cake, as these items provide the most health benefits – especially for pregnant mamas.  Gradient or graduated compression is tightest at the ankle and the pressure decreases gradually as it moves up the leg of the garment.  The graduated element is what makes gradient compression so healthy, because it promotes circulation, energizes tired, achy legs and helps to prevent and reduce swelling.  Pregnant mamas know how beneficial that can be!  All Preggers legwear products offer a level of gradient compression.

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Compression Levels

Our products are available in four different compression levels – known as mmHg or millimeters of mercury.  The levels are aptly named Light (10-15 mmHg), Mild (15-20 mmHg), Moderate (20-30 mmHg) and Firm (30-40 mmHg).  Most people, including pregnant women, can wear Light compression to promote better blood flow and to energize tired achy legs and feet, without the direction of a doctor.  Anything higher than that, however, should be at the advice and direction of a physician.  A physician who knows your individual condition and history can correctly diagnose issues that may benefit from higher compression levels.  Your doctor will also know best as to which compression level is right for you, as well as to ensure you are properly sized.

 

Disclaimer: This article is meant to be informational.  Always follow the advice and recommendations of your doctor.  Consult your doctor before doing anything that you feel might be risky.

 

Myths About Things to Avoid While Pregnant

Myth: You Should Not Get a Flu Shot
Fact: Quite the opposite, actually.  The flu shot is very important for pregnant women because if one was to become infected with the flu, they have a much higher risk of becoming very ill and a higher risk of dying from the flu than those who are not pregnant.  The immunities are also transferred to the baby which will help protect its delicate immune system during the first months after birth.  Some pregnant women worry that preservatives in the flu vaccine will hurt their unborn child, but studies show there is no evidence that the flu vaccine harms fetuses.

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Image courtesy of earlypregnancy.net

Myth: You Can’t Have Your Hair Colored While Pregnant
Fact: Chemicals from hair dyes are absorbed through the skin, but only in very minimal amounts, which are not harmful.  Play it safe by making sure you are having any chemical hair treatments done in a well-ventilated space with a fan.  And for those that are really worried, you can save all your hair treatments for the second and third trimesters.

Myth: You Shouldn’t Fly While Pregnant
Fact: Many pregnant women worry that radiation from airport body scanners and x-ray machines will harm their unborn babies.  But, have no fear.  The amount of radiation is very small will not harm unborn babies.  We are actually exposed to small amounts of radiation on the ground all the time.  So, go ahead and plan that babymoon.  Just make sure that you are safe and sound at home by 34 weeks, as that is usually when most doctors advice you cease travel.  Many airlines will also not allow you to board without a doctor’s note after 34 weeks.  You may run into some leg/ankle swelling while in-flight so make sure to pack some super-comfortable compression socks.

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Myth: Skip the Gym While Pregnant
Fact: If you’ve been a gym regular, there’s no reason to give it up.  It can actually be quite healthy for you and baby.  Just be sure to keep your workouts low-impact and avoid contact sports or any exercises done on your back.  Be sure to check with your doctor to make sure your routine is still safe.  You can help support your belly with the help of support garments or legwear.

Myth: Avoid Sleeping On Your Back
Fact: Doctor’s suggest that it is best to sleep on your left side since this sleep position is known to help increase blood flow to the uterus.  But, if sleeping on your back is more comfortable, there is no harm for your baby.

Myths About Eating While Pregnant

Myth: Double Up On Your Servings Because You’re Eating For Two
Fact: Not so fast!  Even though you are eating for two, you are not eating for two adults!  The average pregnant woman only needs an additional 300 calories per day to adequately nourish both mom and baby.  Normal weight gain should average around 25 to 35 pounds during the whole pregnancy.  Gaining too much can have lasting negative effects on the baby.

Myth: Don’t Eat Fish or Seafood While Pregnant
Fact: Fish is actually very healthy for both mom and baby, as fish contains high amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, which help with baby’s brain development.  Just make sure to stick with coldwater fish, salmon, shrimp or canned tuna, and avoid fish that are high in mercury, such as swordfish, shark, tilefish and king mackerel.

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Image courtesy of Darkkong at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Myth: Eat Three Healthy Meals A Day
Fact: It is actually better for a pregnant woman to eat 6 or 7 small meals per day.  Eating small amounts of healthy food frequently will help keep your blood sugar in normal ranges.

Myth: It’s Okay To Have a Small Drink
Fact: Nope!  Both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend that pregnant women completely avoid drinking alcohol.  There is no amount of alcohol that is safe during pregnancy.

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Image courtesy of Vichaya Kiatying-Angsulee at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Myth: Avoid Caffeine While Pregnant
Fact: Just say no to alcohol, but a little bit of caffeine is okay.  You will definitely want to limit the amount of caffeine that you consume, but most doctors say that 200 milligrams or less a day is perfectly safe.  This amounts to roughly one 12-ounce cup of coffee.

Myth: Avoid Cheese While Pregnant
Fact: No need to cut out all cheeses, but do avoid the soft, unpasteurized cheeses like Brie, feta and goat cheese, as these can carry food-borne illnesses.  Other cheeses are perfectly safe.

Myths About Baby’s Gender or Appearance

Myth: How High or Low You Are Carrying Determines the Baby’s Gender
Fact: There is no scientific fact behind gender playing a role in the shape and position of a pregnant belly.  The look of your bump is determined by the woman’s muscle structure and abdominal fat, as well as the baby’s position and size.

Myth: Craving Certain Foods Reveals What Gender You Are Carrying
Fact: Scientific fact is lacking in this one, too.  Every woman, baby and pregnancy is different.  Different food cravings have no bearing on the baby’s gender.

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Myth: Heartburn Means Baby Will Have a Lot of Hair
Fact: This one is certainly one of the more common myths, but heartburn and hair do not actually go hand in hand.  Many women who had heartburn have bald babies, while those who sailed through pregnancy without the hand on the Tums bottle have had babies with a full head of hair.

Myths About Labor and Delivery

Myth: Your Water Breaks When You Are In Labor
Fact: Sometimes a woman’s water breaks at that start of labor, but more than likely it is a further point through labor before it breaks.  Some doctors will even break your water to help labor progress further.  The bottom line is don’t wait for your water to break.  If your contractions are strong, regular and frequent, don’t wait.  Make your way to your hospital or birthing center.

Myth: Having an Epidural Increases Your Chances of Needing a C-Section
Fact: Studies show that getting an epidural to help relieve some of the pain of labor does not actually increase the risk of a c-section.  Every labor, childbirth, woman and baby is different.  Some may even find that the epidural help move things along.

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Image courtesy of americanpregnancy.org.

Myth: First Babies Always Arrive Late
Fact: While there is a greater percentage of first time moms that deliver late, this is certainly not the rule.  Your menstrual cycle is actually a more accurate way to determine when your baby will arrive.  If your cycles are shorter, you’re more likely to deliver early.  Longer cycles might indicate a later baby.  But, even this is not an exact science.

Myth: Your Second Childbirth Will Be Easier
Fact: Although your first childbirth experience is usually the longest, it isn’t always.  And the second and subsequent births may not always be easier.  Everything will depend on the baby’s position and condition, as well as anything that might be affecting your health.

Myth: You Will Feel An Instant Bond With Your Baby
Fact: Although many moms do feel the bond right away, others may be feeling too exhausted or overwhelmed.  If you don’t feel that bond right away, don’t worry because your bond will grow stronger before you know it.

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Myth: Your Delivery Will Be Like Your Mother’s
Fact: Although you may have a similar body structure as your mother, this is not the only factor in determining what type of labor and delivery you will have.  The size and position of the baby is the main contributing factor, as well as your health, lifestyle and any number of complications that you may be experiencing.

Disclaimer: This article is meant to be informational.  Always follow the advice and recommendations of your doctor.  Consult your doctor before doing anything that you feel might be risky.